+64 3 219 1151 tait@sailsashore.co.nz

South Island Saddleback

Tieke

Philesturnus carunculatus

Saddlebacks are one of the success stories of species conservation. Rats invading their last stronghold on Big South Cape Island in the early ’60’s and only around 40 odd birds rescued. They now are doing very well on Ulva, and other secure islands and have been reintroduced to Big South Cape since it was cleared of rats a few years ago.  Generally pairing for life the territories are defined by singing, with fights rare… I have never seen this. A very active bird, but a lazy flier they travel rapidly through the forest in short flights, buy medications online, long hops and flaps. Adults will react to a taped call, with juveniles much more so coming to investigate.

Size 250 mm

South Island Saddleback

Introduced to Ulva Island post rat eradication. Now doing very well

South Island Saddleback

Juveniles get their adult plumage at around 14 months. 

South Island Saddleback

Gathering nest material

South Island Saddleback

Nestlings, 1 week old

South Island Saddleback

Feeding Juvenile

South Island Saddleback

Primarily insectivorous a hinge mechanism in the jaws give it considerable opening strength,
here used to pry bark off a rimu for insects otherwise hidden. 

South Island Saddleback

 they  take fruit when it’s available. 

South Island Saddleback

Nectar and honey dew are also part of the diet

Brown Creeper Song


Sails Ashore, Kowhai Lane & Sails Tours

11 View Street,
Stewart Island,
9846 NEW ZEALAND

Phone + 64 3 219 1151
Toll Free 0800 783 9278 (NZ only)

Email: tait@sailsashore.co.nz
Web: www.sailsashore.co.nz